33 Things Every Aspiring Entrepreneur Should Know

33 Things Every Aspiring Entrepreneur Should Know

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A few months ago, I crossed the threshold of five years of self-employment with little fanfare or notice. At the time, I was too busy redesigning the site, correcting major payment processor issues that likely resulted in the loss of five-figures worth of revenue, and my girlfriend kept dragging me to a variety of Brazilian beaches. It was a weird month.
If you had asked me in 2007 when I started what I envisioned my business to look like five years from then, I simply would have said that I didn’t. I didn’t envision anything. I started my first iteration of my business like most feisty online entrepreneurs and wanted to make what seemed at the time like “easy money” (Hahahahahahaa! *cough* …ahem.)

Obviously, things didn’t work out that way. Well, except for the hot girl and Brazilian beaches part. I guess that part did work out. But I sure imagined I would be working less. And enjoying it less as well.

Here are 33 things I wish I had known when I started my first business.

1. Sell everything. Save money.

This one would seem obvious, but it’s easy to get ahead of one’s self. My first business actually got off to a strong start. So I chose to “reward” myself with a gratuitous trip to Buenos Aires with some friends and proceeded to blow most of the money I had saved up from my first six months. Less than a year later, I would be broke and begging my ex-girlfriend to let me live with her so I didn’t end up on the street. Don’t make the same mistake I did.

2. Monetize your free time.

A big complaint of a lot of people who want to start businesses is that they don’t have enough “free time.” Between work, hobbies and social obligations, they have maybe an hour or two a day to sit down and hammer out that new business idea they’ve been sitting on.

No, no, no, wrong, wrong, wrong. If it feels like you’re giving up your free time to work on a second job, then you’re screwed before you even start. Take what you love to do anyway — basketball stat analysis, home gardening, furniture carving, whatever — and simply monetize that. That’s your most obvious starting point. That way you’re not giving up any free-time, you’re expanding it.

3. Surround yourself with other entrepreneurs.

A great point Dan Andrews made on a podcast with me: surround yourself with the type of people you want to become. If all of your friends are bored desk jockeys, then there will be an unconscious social pressure for you to continue on as a bored desk jockey. They will not understand your aspirations, or even worse, they may resent them. Find other people who are in a similar position as you and push and motivate one another.

4. Quit your day job as soon as is reasonable.

I wrote about this extensively here. Burn the boats behind you. Give yourself no option of retreat.

5. Be shameless.

Aspiring to do something no one else has ever done takes a certain degree of delusional self belief. You must be willing to make an ass out of yourself here and there. Cold-calling dozens of prospective clients and telling them that you can do a better job for them than anyone else. Pitching your new product to people who didn’t even know it existed. Promising delivery on content or services which you only kind of, sort of, know how to deliver on (but are willing to figure it out as you go along). You have to be shameless about this stuff.

6. Fuck your business idea.

Henry Ford didn't invent the car. He just figured out how to build them better.

Henry Ford didn’t invent the car. He just figured out how to build them better than anyone else.

Mark Cuban once said that every great business idea you have, you should assume that 100 other people have had the same idea and are already working on it. Business ideas don’t matter. What matters is execution.

A lot of people are proud of themselves for coming up with a cool idea. But the most successful businesses in history were rarely new ideas. Google wasn’t a new idea. Facebook wasn’t a new idea. Microsoft wasn’t a new idea. All of these companies merely executed better than anyone else.

7. Less reading, more doing.

Try to only read when you need a specific solution to a problem you’ve run into in the work you’re doing. For instance, don’t just sit around and read about marketing because you think maybe you should know about marketing. Ugh, how fucking boring (this, in a nutshell, is why college kind of sucks by the way). Read about marketing when your new project needs a new marketing strategy. Suddenly, that same reading becomes a lot more interesting.

Many people use reading up on what they want to do as a way to avoid actually doing what they want to do. Reading is useless without execution.

8. Test, test, test.

You don’t know anything until you’ve tested it. I don’t care if Frank Kern said it or Dan Kennedy said it or your step-mom said it. You don’t know until you test it. Every marketing seminar I’ve ever watched and every marketing book I’ve ever read told me to raise my prices. Yet, every split-test ever I’ve done on my books through this site, the lower priced book not only killed it in terms of revenue, but also generated more referrals, more positive reviews and traffic to my site.

9. Be eccentric.

You can’t stand out unless you’re different. Capitalize on your quirkiness.

10. Obsess about your brand.

The reality of the current economy is that pretty much any information, product or service a person wants, they already have dozens of choices of who to purchase them from. Scarcity doesn’t exist anymore. Differentiation purely through price or quality is an almost impossible strategy for entering or dominating a new market. What dominates now is brand. Your brand defines the relationship you have with your prospect and customer. It’s why they come back to you and not the other 11 Joe Schmoe’s offering the same exact service.

11. Don’t deliver a product, deliver an experience.

Steve Jobs said that he wanted Apple products to provide an experience, not just a function. Apple is possibly the strongest brand on the planet right now. This is what I mean when I say obsess about your brand: obsess about the experience you’re giving your customers, not just the information or product you’re giving them.

12. Believe in what you’re doing.

Otherwise, even if you do become successful, you’re just stuck in another grind. But this time, it’s of your own making.

13. Your business will evolve. Let it.

No one gets it right the first time. Or the second. Or the twenty-third. Cue cliché about Thomas Edison or Michael Jordan here. Information is always imperfect. Markets are always changing. What worked last year may not work this year. You don’t stay on top of things unless you’re evolving with them. Don’t marry yourself to your idea or original business plan.

14. Fuck Tim Ferriss.

If you’re only working four hours a week, your business is going to be antiquated within a decade and chances are you’re getting bored as shit with your life anyway.

15. A blog is not a business plan.

It’s just not. Don’t start a blog to make money. Start a blog because you love to write. Start a blog to share something you love. But don’t start a blog to make money. No blogger who is making mega-bucks off their content started that way or planned it that way. It just happened. And it took years. Not months, years.

16. You’re going to need either a lot of time or capital.

Or both. There is no such thing as overnight success.

Earnership117. Business is not about making money.

It’s about value and values. If you continue to monetize what you personally value, you’ll never tire of working (in fact, you’ll look forward to it). If you optimize the value your business generates, the money will happen as a side-effect. There’s a subtle difference between value and money. Sometimes you must eat a chunk of money to create greater long-term value. If you’re just in it for the bottom line, you’ll never be willing to do this.

18. Capitalize on luck.

You’re going to have good luck and bad luck. We all do. No sense complaining about it or taking credit for it. Instead, hunker down and be sure to capitalize on both.

19. Slow to hire, fast to fire.

Cliché, but true. Especially when outsourcing. Almost every internet entrepreneur I have met has horror stories about outsourcing, myself included. Short version: you usually get what you pay for.

20. Embrace existential stress.

When you have a job, your stress is about external approval — deadlines, meetings, presentations — and it usually comes from your boss. It’s annoying and it comes in short, strong bursts.

When you work for yourself, you give up having to constantly fight for this external approval. What you trade it in for is this low-level constant gnawing sense that everything is going to collapse and disappear one day. Yeah, I can wake up at noon every day. I can work when I want. But in a corporate job you don’t have to worry about showing up to work one day and the building not being there anymore. An entrepreneur thinks about this on a weekly basis.

21. If you’re not pissing some people off, you’re doing it wrong.

Dan Kennedy said, “If you haven’t pissed someone off by noon, then you probably aren’t making any money.” My experience has shown this to be true. As I once said:

“You cannot be an attractive and life-changing presence to some people without being a joke or an embarrassment to others. You simply can’t. You have to be controversial to succeed.”

 

22. Did I mention you should be testing?

Seriously, half of the stuff that grows your business is impossible to implement if you’re not regularly testing your ideas out in the marketplace. Hell, don’t even START your business until you’ve tested the idea out in the marketplace.

23. 80/20: Never forget.

It really is staggering how much it applies to.

24. Get 1000 True Fans.

The idea is that in the internet age, you only need to convince 1,000 people to give you $100 per year to make a six figure income. When viewed in those terms, it’s far less intimidating. Corollary to this is the 100 True Customers idea, if you’re in the consulting/services world.

25. As in the corporate world, networking is everything.

Yes, it’s still a great way to get new clients and/or job offers. But in the entrepreneur world, it’s even more useful to see what’s working for other people’s businesses and what you may be able to steal and use in yours.

26. Know thyself.

I work best at night. I hate structure and make lots of lists, half of which I never look at again. I manage my time with iTunes playlists. A lot of the things that work well for me fly against all of the time management advice you’ll ever read out there. But this is how I’m wired and I cater to what works best for me. Do what’s best for you.

27. The 1000 Day Rule.

The 1000 Day Rule states that you should expect to be WORSE off than you were at your day job for the first 1000 days of your new business.

28. If it feels like work, you’re doing it wrong.

You can either make money to do what you love, or you can do what you love to make money. You choose.

Screen Shot 2013-03-11 at 3.34.07 PM

29. Don’t get rich quick.

All of the shortcuts for short-term gains either gut your long-term brand and loyalty, or they just put you back in a position of being chained to something you don’t care about or believe in. If you love what you do (and you should), and you’re investing regularly in the evolution of the business (which you are), then having a bunch of money sitting around to buy useless shit should not be a priority of yours. Seriously, get some self esteem somewhere else if it’s that important to you.

30. STOP TALKING ABOUT IT AND TEST IT!

I don’t know the answer! And neither do you! So test it and find out!

31. If you’re not scared to death of abject failure, you’re doing it wrong.

In fact, I’ve found that the more something terrifies me (i.e., writing the new book), the more I need to be doing it.

32. Treat your customers like family.

They’re the only reason you’re here in the first place. Treat them with respect. Reply to their emails promptly. Answer their questions. Give them free shit.

33. This will be a part of your permanent identity, choose wisely.

The idea of, “I’ll do this for a few years, make a bunch of money for a few years, and then go do what I REALLY love!” is a myth. It never works out. That’s how I originally got into this biz, and I see dozens of people doing the same. Yet, it never happens.

hate-job
Eventually I had to suck it up and admit that what I had created was a career in internet marketing, whether I intended to or not. And since I was stuck with this as a career, I might as well turn my assets into something I was passionate about and loved doing. Hence, building postmasculine.com a year and a half ago. When I created it, I gave up my other business ventures and effectively cut my monthly income in half. But, I figured, if this is what I’m passionate about, and I love doing it, it will be more than worth it in the long-run.

And it already has been…

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45 Comments

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  • Reply

    Benjamin

    2 months ago

    #14 – “Fuck Tim Ferriss”

    That gave me a good laugh! Really great list. I’m going through school for marketing right now and they barely teach half of what’s on this list.

  • Reply

    anton

    2 months ago

    I really dug this article. I liked:

    - The thousand day rule. It’s hard to explain to others why I would choose business over a steady job, especially a couple years later, when it SEEMS like I’m barely better off than peers.

    - The burn the boats bit. I secretly love this because even when I want to quit, I can’t…and every few months I look back at the progress and am grateful that I couldn’t quit.

    - This bit about being delusional. It’s sort of true. It’s the only way that I have been able to get my foot in the door and with some pretty big clients too. It amazes me, and I’m glad you were able to put this into words for me.

    - The first thousand fans part.

  • Reply

    Zac

    2 months ago

    Mark, I wouldn’t mess with Tim Ferris. I hear he can push you out of a circle. He’d probably have someone from Asia do it for 2 dollars an hour though.

    • Reply

      Tyler

      2 months ago

      Haha

      Coincidentally, or perhaps not so, Tim’s “minimum effective dose” for internet marketing is the “1000 true fans” article mentioned here.

      Agree with Mark though…the path to that is paved with dilligent and passionate effort, not outsourced “hacks” and gimmicks.

    • Reply

      James

      2 months ago

      21. If you’re not pissing some people off, you’re doing it wrong.

  • Reply

    Jay Neyer

    2 months ago

    Good stuff as always. Point 29 really resonated with me. I know I’ve been guilty of focusing on making a quick buck rather than enjoying the process with slow, steady growth. Slow growth just isn’t as sexy as the get rich quick gimmicks, but it’s what leads to that delicate balance between pleasure and financial security in my opinion.

    One of the things you mentioned constantly throughout was testing. What do you recommend for doing this? Is it as simple as AB testing or do you have particular methods you like to employ? Thanks for the read.

  • Reply

    Derek Scruggs

    2 months ago

    I think this i kind of true in dating. Another way to think about it is, who is your target demographic? It’s netter to have a very small group of girl types that love your style than a much bigger crop that just thinks your so-so. If you focus on the type of girl you really want, you must also reject and possibly alienate the ones who don’t fit that profile.

    Here’s a great video about this idea (scroll down to bottom of post): http://erikanapoletano.com/blog/polar-bears-sarah-palin-and-pie-charts-erikas-tedx-boulder-talk/

  • Reply

    Kevin

    2 months ago

    In regards to ’20. Embrace existential stress’, people always talk about working for a company as if those those types of jobs have bulletproof security, but people get laid off out of nowhere from them all the time. Nothing magically safe about working for someone else.

    • Reply

      Mark Manson

      2 months ago

      I guess a better way to put it is imagine you work for a company and word gets out that there’s going to be a round of lay-offs and nobody knows who it’s going to be. So you go a few weeks watching people around you get laid off and have no idea if you’re next.

      Now imagine feeling like that perpetually.

      • Reply

        Tyler

        2 months ago

        For what it’s worth, Just keep being honest and active on here and you will be fine. This is the only blog that I read regularly, and I can safely say that I have bought things on here that definitely looked interesting but not necessarily something I felt an urgent need to buy, simply because I want to support you.

        You could probably post from a Guatemalan prison asking for bail money and get it in an hour.

        • Reply

          Mark Manson

          2 months ago

          Yeah, the existential stress has morphed… I am no longer terrified of going out of business or going broke.

          What keeps me up at night now is the thought that I’ve peaked.

          Thanks for the support btw.

          • Tyler

            2 months ago

            Absolutely.

            Interesting, I’ve been curious for awhile as to whether or not you ever felt that way. I mean, after writing such a tour de force as “Models,” I can see how the after effect could cause you to wonder what comes next.

            If anything though I only see the quality of the PM experience going up. The feeling you get here is unique and rich. It’s tough to put into words, but it’s almost like watching your favorite movie, even though you’ve seen it 100 times. Even though it’s that familiar, it resonates so perfectly with your identity/deep personal philosophy that it never gets old. I probably sound like a broken record since that is essentially what “1000 true fans” is all about, but you know what I mean.

          • Paul

            2 months ago

            Hey man, from a witness’ perspective, I think your peak is yet to come. This will be more than a buisness and a blog – it can and will be a movement, if that is what your heart resonates with. Keep on being open and receptive like you have been. Whether you realize it or not, you are ‘modeling’ something for all of us. I believe in this stuff.

  • Reply

    Oli

    2 months ago

    “I manage my time with iTunes playlists.” I’m stealing that. I’m also one of those anti-structure people. I feel like most organization and management advice is useful to people who are unaware of the ways in which they waste their willpower, or the excuses they make to procrastinate. But once you’re aware of that stuff in the back of your head, the extra structure can just totally kill creativity and necessary flexibility.

  • Reply

    Dan

    2 months ago

    Hey Mark,

    Huge congrats on passing the 5 year point. I will get to 4 years in April, so a lot of the article rung true with me. Especially monetizing my interests – after studying literature at university I spent my 20s ‘performing’ in jobs that allowed me to travel, but I always got jaded and moved on after a few years. All I really wanted to do was get paid to read tons of books, travel and learn languages. The obsessive, introverted geekery that made office life such a headache, is now my superpower and I get paid accordingly as a translator. Tim Ferriss’ advice should definitely be taken with a grain of salt but, in fairness, reading the Four-Hour Work Week did give me that final little push I needed to take the leap. Here’s to living the dream!

  • Reply

    Ivan

    2 months ago

    FAN-FUCKING-TASTIC POST!!! This guy speaks the truth people. Starting a business is a motherfucker… You always hear people say to the owners: “Man you have it easy as the boss. You scratch your balls all day long.” NOTHING could be further away from the truth. Ignorance is bliss :)

  • Reply

    IamMarktoo

    2 months ago

    Great website and I enjoyed your interview with T. Look forward to more. I too tend to organise my life with playlists.

  • Reply

    IamMarktoo

    2 months ago

    Oh, meant to leave a link for the oriface works. Worth a read http://michaelochurch.wordpress.com/2013/02/19/gervais-principle-questioned-macleods-hierarchy-the-technocrat-and-vc-startups/ Addtionally, the link to The Office sitcom comparison is worth a read too.

  • Reply

    Amber J.

    2 months ago

    Sorry to bust into the boys club here, but I love this post. Especially the advice of testing everything, or at least doing some kind of research and finding out some answers. In the past I’ve driven myself crazy thinking about different ideas, and only testing their effectiveness IN MY MIND. Pointless, right?

    Now, I’m getting out there. When I have a question, I find an answer. When I have an idea, I figure out a no-cost way to test it out. Step one of implementation.

    Rock on, dude.

  • Reply

    Kevin

    2 months ago

    Wait, how do you manage your time with iTunes playlists? Like you know how long one is and work on a task until all the songs are done?

    • Reply

      Mark Manson

      2 months ago

      Exactly.

      I make playlists to last how long I want to focus on a task. So let’s say tomorrow I want to spend 2 hours writing a post, and 4 hours doing research and outlining for the new book. I have a variety of playlists that range from 55 minutes to 2 hours long. So I’ll say, “OK, I’m going to do two 1 hour playlists on the post with a break in the middle.” And so on…

      I basically know that I can’t get up or screw around on Facebook or whatever until that playlist is up… then I goof off for 10-15 minutes and then line up another playlist.

      Scheduling stuff and having timers and stuff like that never worked for me. I hate structure. I like to be able to say, “OK, I have relatively 6 hours worth of stuff I want to do tomorrow,” but not holding myself to when I do it and what order I do it in (unless something’s urgent, obviously).

  • Reply

    Holly

    2 months ago

    Loved the list…many, many truths. Especially liked that parts about differentiating yourself, obsessing about the brand and networking to steal ideas–good stuff :) Networking also helps to keep your brand in perspective. It forces you to look at your business through different lenses.

  • Reply

    Keenan

    2 months ago

    Great post! Seeing as how you repeatedly mentioned the importance of testing, is there anyway we could get a post or link about how to get started with testing? You’ve definitely built up an amazing venue of value I will say! Keep up the good job!

  • Reply

    Kartik

    2 months ago

    This was one hell of an article man. I’m currently figuring out how to apply these to the career I want to have some day. (Opera Singer) The more I think on it, the more I feel that professional musicians are both the entrepreneur and the product being sold. (as cold as it feels to put it that way, it makes sense to me) And man, 31. I feel this every damn day even though I’m still just a student.

  • Reply

    Aaron Belsh

    2 months ago

    Great post. I was pleasantly surprised that you spat out 33 relevant things for me to think about. Good job.

  • Reply

    Dani

    2 months ago

    Fantastic list, Mark!
    I’m visiting family for Spring break, and one of the first questions my relatives ask me is, “So, what are you majoring in now?” I tell them that I changed my major to business and entrepreneurship and they’re like, “Ohhh… cool.” Not feeling positive vibes from them.
    I have a business now, but it’s been so hard to convince others that it is as viable in the long term as I know it will be. I know I’m going to be successful because I spend my free time doing it anyway. I’m just cashing in on it now.
    Thanks for sharing this list. Sometimes we need a little reminder that we aren’t completely nuts (or at least, not completely alone).

    Cheers,

    Dani

  • Reply

    Jason

    2 months ago

    Real talk. Thanks for the inspiration, Mark. Being at the 6 month point, this both affirms what I’ve figured out already (obsess over your brand), and prepares me for what’s to come (1,000 day rule). I guess we’re the lucky ones, like Neo waking up from the Matrix.

  • Reply

    Pete R.

    2 months ago

    This post is way too great not to share. I can not stress how important #2 is. “Monetize you’re free time” is the best way to put it. If you are able to monetize your hobby, you will never work again in your life. :)

  • Reply

    Alexis R.

    2 months ago

    This is seriously some of the best, most level-headed advice I’ve ever read. I really love how you pushed how important it is to work in what your love and not merely “Get rich and then REALLY do what you love”. A lot of people I feel think that way but don’t realize that this isn’t about just moving around aimlessly and flying of to Timbuktu, Auckland, and Valparaiso all in one week, its about developing an identity and taking constructive action to re develop oneself.

    I think one thing you skirted around but really didn’t make clear is how everyone has to hustle for the first sale. That first or first couple of sales is crucial to seeing how your customers react as well as giving you confidence that this is possible.

    Also lol at the Fuck Tim Ferris. I used to think Tim Ferris was an idiot for making people think they could work 4 hours a week for an extended period of time (which didn’t compensate for competition, now that thousands of more people are living the Tim Ferris/geo arbirtage/ online entrepreneur thing, 4 hours just isn’t enough to compete in some cases). But then I saw an interview he did where he said 4 hour work week wasn’t about working 4 hours a week, it was about finding out how to control time, location, and hyper focus on certain steps to make oneself insanely productive. In other words how much of a person 40 hour work week is actually spent producing high-quality work?

    Regardless amazing article, I wish I could’ve made it to your speech down here at USC.

    • Reply

      Mark Manson

      2 months ago

      Yes. As Gary Vaynerchuk says, “Hustle is the most important word in the english language.”

      Glad you liked it.

  • Reply

    Shelda Amilcar

    2 months ago

    wow…that’s really help me with my homework…thanks

  • Reply

    Beeski Livius

    1 month ago

    Loved the article, and thanks for changing the the post form! (from lifefyre). I’ve especially loved this bit: If you optimize the value your business generates, the money will happen as a side-effect. It reminds me the idea of “be so good that they simply can’t ignore you”, which is my current motto in terms of business.

    I also think, that the beginning tends to be harder and slower…but as soon as you get some momentum things start to get easier. The experience, the trust of customers, the social proof, the popularity…all of these start to amplify the business, but we do have to stay focused and motivated in the first stage of the business, which as you pointed out, sadly may take a few good years.

    Thanks for the post, and good luck with the Postmasculine book. Can’t wait to get my hands on it.

  • Reply

    Gelnn

    1 month ago

    How do I get my picture in a Mark Manson comment?

  • Reply

    Luke

    1 month ago

    I enjoyed this article.

    About the Tim Ferriss point.. He has openly stated many times that “4 hours of work per week” is not to be taken completely literally, and that no, he obviously does not work only 4 hours per week. Anyone who has read his blog or watched any interviews with him would know this. The title of the book is simply to get the point across that your income can be separate from your time input (i.e. set yourself up so that you don’t need to work more hours to make more money).

    Either way, good article.

  • Reply

    CamaTin1

    1 month ago

    HEY MARK ! What an interesting wake up is this that you pushed me into..? Looks like you sees peoples mind like me…. It’s kind of the stuffs that i been searching for, but finally here we go. “Bravo” Mark for the pieces of Advice.
    ”KEEP EM UP “

  • Reply

    Entreb

    1 month ago

    Interesting, intriguing and true. These tips should be read by all aspiring entrepreneurs to realize what’s the real world that is waiting for them. Entrepreneurship is a tough world, and every aspiring entrepreneur should strive think outside the box and to stand out from the crowd.

  • Reply

    Tapiwa

    20 weeks ago

    Great read! And I noticed you said somewhere in there that college is kinda a waste of time and I totally agree…I’m still doing it though but rather for personal achievements sake and not in the delusion that a single piece of papaer called a “degree” will guarantee any success.

  • Reply

    Leigh McClurg

    20 weeks ago

    I really loved this article. First one I’ve read of its ilk that actually reads as honest. I apply this quote as a litmus test to all articles I read like this:

    “Life is pain… Anyone who says differently is selling something.” – William Goldman

    When ever anyone promises painfree success, or even only mildly uncomfortable success I tune out. Pain is part of the game. We need it to fuel the fire to get up and change something.

    Thanks for explaining your process and confirming that I’m on the right path, without trying to sell me something. I’ve subscribed to your blog because of it.

  • Reply

    Melanie Sorensen

    19 weeks ago

    Just discovered your blog Mark – awesome post – super refreshing.

  • Reply

    Mike

    19 weeks ago

    Luke, couldn’t agree more.

    I’m amazed at the number of mouth-breathers throwing hate around about 4HWW. That title sells, and that’s why it exists. Anyone who takes him literally is either trolling (I’m guessing that’s Marks case), or has seriously missed the point.

  • Reply

    Katherine

    19 weeks ago

    Love this! Couldn’t have read it at a better time. Just in the process of starting up my own business and this really helps

  • Reply

    gelebona

    15 weeks ago

    Could not have read a more timely encapsulation of the why/how/what behind entrepreneurialism and its costs/sacrifices/process/end game goal.

  • Reply

    Jeffrey Friend

    2 weeks ago

    It’s good to know I’m not taking crazy pills over here. I work until 1am-3am just about every night, it’s how I’m wired. I fought it for a long time, but it’s just who I am. All of these points are awesome. That bit about stress (#20) – I thought I was being ridiculous for fearing that everything was going to end suddenly. It’s a serious fear.

    An additional tip would be to be mindful of how you’re using your time. If you find yourself sidetracked, doing the dishes too many times, doing random chores around the house, etc. – Stop. Go back to the kitchen table, your desk, wherever you work, and start working on something important. We say we don’t have enough time in the day. We do, we just use it on ridiculous tasks.

  • Reply

    Tom Lambert

    2 months ago

    I’m surprised they’re teaching you anything close to this be honest…you must go to a decent school

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