You Are Your Own Worst Enemy

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There’s a parable that I’ve heard a few times passed around self improvement seminars and books. It goes like this:

As my friend passed by the elephants, he suddenly stopped, confused by the fact that these huge creatures were being held by only a rope tied to their legs. It was obvious that the elephants could, at any time, break free from the ropes they were tied to, but for some reason they did not. My friend saw the trainer nearby and asked why these beautiful, magnificent animals just stood there and made no attempt to escape.

“Well,” he said, “when they are very young and much smaller we use the same size rope to tie them and at that age it’s enough to hold them. As they grow up, they are conditioned to believe that they cannot break away. They believe the rope can still hold them, so they never try to break free.” My friend was amazed. These animals could at any time break free from their bonds but because they believed they couldn’t, they were stuck right where they were. The powerful and gigantic creature limited its present abilities by the limitations of its past. How many of us go through life believing the ropes tied to us?

We all assume we’re right all the time. It’s human nature. If we didn’t think we were right, then we wouldn’t do what we do or think what we think. But the problem with us all believing that we’re right is that we’re not. In fact, most of us are wrong most of the time. All of us.

Whether believing the earth was flat, that man could never fly, that Gods who created the world lived on Mt. Olympus, that masturbation caused one to go blind, that the earth was created in six days six thousand years ago — all of these beliefs were “right” at one time, and were eventually proven wrong. In fact, you could say that almost every single belief held throughout human history has eventually been proven wrong and replaced by a more correct belief. And that most of the beliefs we hold today are probably wrong in some shape or form and will eventually be replaced by more correct versions.

Which begs the question, what do you believe today which will be replaced in the future? And I don’t mean on a philosophical level, but on a personal one. Look into your past, what is something you used to think was “right” but turned out to be wrong? I used to think women would only sleep with a guy who wanted to be their boyfriend. I was horribly wrong. I used to believe that nobody would care about what I wrote and procrastinated starting a blog for over six months as a result. Wrong. I used to believe that I was just genetically weak and would never put on any muscle no matter how hard I tried. Wrong again. I used to believe that hot women were only interested in guys who were buff or had a lot of money. Definitely wrong. These were all ropes tied to my legs and it wasn’t until I considered trying to break them that I realized I could.

That’s the problem with being wrong all the time, we never know that we’re wrong. We wait for something or someone to come along and prove us wrong instead of testing our beliefs out for ourselves. We stand around waiting for someone to untie our ropes for us instead of trying to break free on our own.

The Danger of Limiting Beliefs

Limiting beliefs are beliefs that something we wish to accomplish is not possible for some reason, and therefore they prevent us from taking action or responsibility towards that goal. The elephants believing they were stuck to the ropes was their limiting belief. An example is someone believing he can’t get a job in finance without an Ivy League degree, so he doesn’t even bother applying. Another is the belief that women are only attracted to men of their own race, so a guy doesn’t put in the effort required to find a girl who does like him.

But sometimes limiting beliefs don’t even need to have a reason for them. For instance, someone may believe that he’s simply not talented enough to become a professional musician. Why? Just because. Or someone may believe that he’s unattractive and no woman would ever date him. Why? Just because.

Limiting beliefs are born from rationalizations of previous painful experiences. They’re an adaptive measure by our mind — earlier experiences cause us pain, so we construct beliefs in which to avoid those experiences in the future. Limiting beliefs are also designed to remove responsibility from ourselves. That way we’ll never hurt ourselves again by thinking we can change our situation. It’s not that the elephants believe they’re too weak, it’s that the rope is too strong and therefore they believe there’s nothing they can do about it.

We all get hurt when we’re younger. We all experience some degree of trauma. And to explain away the pain, we construct rationalizations to protect ourselves. If these rationalizations are reinforced enough, they become permanent beliefs.

So, for instance, someone who is bullied in class regularly growing up may rationalize that he’s made fun of because he’s stupid and will never succeed intellectually. This explanation is easier to stomach than the alternative: that people can be cruel and that you must stand up for yourself sometimes.

So as the bullying recurs, like a stream eroding a valley through the earth, each time the event occurs, the rationalization imprints itself deeper and deeper into our brains. Pretty soon, it’s no longer an excuse, but a permanently-held belief. One which we’re unlikely to question at any time in our lives.

Most of us develop beliefs like this unconsciously when we’re young. But sometimes beliefs begin when we’re older. Let’s say when you are 20 years old, you go to a party for the first time. Everyone’s drinking and you’re excited to talk to some girls. You make an awkward and nervous approach and the girl is a real bitch — she makes fun of you and rejects you in front of everyone else. Your self-esteem is shattered and instead of recognizing the situation for what it was — one bitchy girl — you decide the girls at parties are full of themselves and can’t be trusted.

The most unfortunate aspect of limiting beliefs is that our mind is constructed to unconsciously find evidence which already supports our currently-held beliefs. In psychology, this is referred to as the subjective validation bias. Once the belief is adopted, our mind then goes on auto-pilot to continue reinforcing it.

So our poor rejected party-goer will likely begin to perceive bitchy behaviors in all of the girls at the party. Look at how entitled and pushy that girl is when she asks for another beer. Oh, look at that girl, she doesn’t even like the guy she’s dancing with, she’s probably using him for attention to make some other guy jealous. Look at that girl standing by herself, does she think she’s too good for everybody?

You Are Your Own Worst Enemy

When you dig deep enough, chances are the biggest thing holding you back is yourself.

Each rationalization reinforces the original excuse, that girls at parties are bitches, deeper entrenching the belief further and further until it goes unquestioned.

Once the limiting belief is solidified, our captivity is completed through self-fulfilling prophecy. Self-fulfilling prophecy is when our beliefs unconsciously alter our actions to reinforce those same beliefs. We all do it. We can’t help it. For instance, in one famous study, psychologists found that giving test-subjects non-alcoholic beer and then giving them a fake breathalyzer telling them that they were drunk, the subjects responded just as poorly to acuity tests as people who actually were drunk. The subjects were lead to believe they were drunk and therefore unconsciously behaved accordingly. Their poor acuity scores only reinforced their belief that they were drunk and most of them refused to believe the psychologists when they were told they were administered non-alcoholic beverages.

In a similar vein, our rejected party-goer’s newly solidified belief that all girls at parties are stuck-up bitches will now influence his behavior in future encounters with girls at parties. At the next party he’s at, each girl he comes in contact with he will treat as if she’s stuck up and full of herself — i.e., he will not exactly be friendly or relaxed around her. This, in turn, is more likely to elicit negative responses from the girls — after all, when you treat a girl like a bitch, she’s likely to act like one — and thus he further solidifies his belief that they’re all stuck-up bitches. He’s now an elephant tied to a rope, which he doesn’t even realize he can break. It’s a vicious cycle, as belief influences behavior which in turn influences results which reinforces the original belief that led to a negative result to begin with.

How to Break Your Ropes

We’re all hindered by many of our own beliefs. The problem, like the elephants, is that we don’t realize which beliefs are hindering us. Here is a step-by-step guide to identifying some of your own limiting beliefs and rewiring them in yourself. It will help to go through this if you first identify an area of your life which you’d like to excel in but feel stuck or held back. The example I will use is someone who wishes he could be a professional musician, but you can apply these principles to just about anything.

1. Self-Skepticism – Since we all believe that we’re always right, and since we know that we’re all sometimes wrong, let’s go ahead and err on the side of being wrong and question everything we believe. Go ahead and assume that everything you know and think is likely wrong or incomplete. This will require a great deal of humility and uncertainty, which is not easy for many to stomach, but it’s necessary.

A man who believes he knows everything is a man who learns nothing. What’s more important: being right, or changing your life?

Our friend who wants to become a professional musician has the following beliefs: that he does not have enough time to practice to play in a band regularly; that he needs to buy some high-quality gear if he’s ever going to attract good people to play with; that he hasn’t written a song in nearly a decade and fears he’s forgotten how; that he’s not a talented singer and can’t be very good at it.

Once he stops and considers (or perhaps assumes) that all of these beliefs are incorrect — that he does have enough time to practice and play in a band, that he’s just not making the time; that he doesn’t need high quality gear right now, he can always buy it later; that if he could do it before he can do it again; that anyone can sing, it simply takes practice — it now not only removes his excuses for failure, but presents him routes to accomplish his goal.

2. Collect Evidence to the Contrary – The second step is to counter-act our subjective validation bias, and instead of recognizing what supports our belief, to consciously look for what goes against our limiting belief. This is particularly easy if you have beliefs about large populations of people — i.e., women never date a guy shorter than them — if you start looking, you’ll find plenty of couples where the guy is shorter. Sure, it’s a minority, but there are millions of men in the world dating women taller than them (I know probably half a dozen myself). Start looking for them. Chances are they’re out there, you were just choosing not to notice them before.

For our musician friend, it’s time for him to start paying attention to evidence that contradicts his beliefs. Perhaps meeting and recognizing gigging musicians who have a day job or who don’t have great equipment, or realizing that a lot of history’s great songwriters didn’t begin composing until their mid-20′s or even early-30′s.

3. Plan on Being the Exception – If you’ve done step two well enough, it will be undeniable to you that there are at least exceptions to your limiting belief. It may not be normal, but women will date a shorter guy. It may not be typical but white women will date minority men. It may not be expected, but a guy with no high school education can get a job at a financial firm. The next step is to plan on being the exception. Ask yourself what this would take? In the cases of height and race with women in the above situation, it probably simply means approaching more women than the next guy and not letting yourself get discouraged. That’s not too hard.

For our musician friend, it would be challenging himself to join a gigging band without the extra time and gear he believes he needs first.

4. Take Full Responsibility for Failures – The most important step to not falling back into your past belief patterns is to take full responsibility for your results. If women who are taller than you or of a different race reject you, don’t blame it on your height or your race, blame it on things you have control of: your style, your ability to connect with them, your nervousness when meeting them.

If our musician friend auditions for a few bands and it doesn’t work out, he should not blame his lack of equipment or his lack of talent, but focus on what he can do better — learn the songs better beforehand, try to relate to the band-members better, display his passion and excitement more, and yes, practice more.

Delusional Self-Confidence

Since we’re all going to be wrong about most of the things we believe, why not choose to overestimate one’s chances rather than underestimate them? Why not assume you’re more than capable rather than less than capable? Why not see yourself as blessed with amazing opportunities instead of a victim who’s been screwed over by the world? Both are inaccurate views — or rather, both are subjective views and neither can ever be proven definitively.

You are capable of so much more than you currently think. Why not find evidence that supports THAT belief? That you live a privileged and blessed life already and don’t need anything to prove it to yourself? That women would be lucky to be with you? That any financial firm or band would be lucky to have you join them?

Why not try on those beliefs and see how they affect your behavior, see how that behavior affects your results and see how those results affect your worldview?

Research has shown that people who overestimate their abilities perform better than those who underestimate their abilities. It’s no coincidence that the most successful people in the world tend to be megalomaniacs. Or as Steve Jobs once said: “It’s the people who are crazy enough to believe they can change the world who do.”

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44 Comments

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  • Reply

    Andy

    4 months ago

    Awesome article! More of this, please! :)

  • Reply

    Halo Effect

    4 months ago

    This was a really well-written article. Very thorough and nicely structured.

  • Reply

    Surid

    4 months ago

    Really enjoyed this one.

  • Reply

    Jake

    4 months ago

    Yes, this is a concept I’ve known about for a long time but you really gave it the deluxe car wash treatment here!

  • Reply

    Chris

    4 months ago

    Man, part of the reason I love studying Philosophy is strongly related and reinforced by this post.

    I’m constantly reminded of the fact that I know essentially (in the grand scheme) nothing and am certainly wrong to some degree about everything I hold to be true. It’s all just working hypotheses – there is always the potential for refinement.

    An assortment of delicious bits of wisdom to digest. ~Classic Mark.

  • Reply

    Paul

    4 months ago

    This is the kind of wisdom that when internalized by other people, it makes the world a better place. Very, very impressed. Keep it up.

  • Reply

    Rock

    4 months ago

    Mark, I just posted an opus to your writing skills. It disappeared into the abyss. Anyway your right about “Delusional Self-Confidence”

  • Reply

    Chaos

    4 months ago

    Ahh, I should join the others. Inspiring and really well written article Mark.

  • Reply

    CharlesB

    4 months ago

    I think you should have asked me before with this example of musician:)
    I was into music since I was teenager,and when I had to leave my ex-band,started popping up unreasonable limiting beliefs.I even thought I was too fat to play music!Years later,It thanks to a friend who invited me to form a band,I realised how much I ld love doing this,but I had to break more and more limiting beliefs,to freely express myself.

    • Reply

      Daniel

      4 months ago

      Yup. I two have many stories and could talk about them for days and days. But it all depends about your own faith. Because that is the substance. And the most powerful gift and tool only we have been blessed with. But somehow we lost the knowledge of how to use this powerful crazy kick ass mean of a sword gun thingamajig people say we apparently have. We tried pulling the trigger. Swinging in the air like a crazy child trying to find out if it’s true. Because lets face it. It would be awesome. But it may sound just too good to be true. So I don’t know. Have you seen how crazy a lot of people looked trying the same thing. Or are we just making excuses to justify our inability?

  • Reply

    Jack

    4 months ago

    As the old skeptics used to say

    “All I know is that I know nothing, and I’m not even sure about that!” :-)

  • Reply

    Daniel

    4 months ago

    Almost likened with a message resonating throughout time and space. Like opening the cage doors of all captive and saying your free to go. But alas, should a prison guard open the doors and deliver message of new developments and the prisoner reacts with “it’s not April you know, what’s the catch? I won’t be fooled into whatever trick or joke you’re pulling. I know what is right and that ain’t it, so it must be wrong”. Turns back around into his reality of staring into the prison ceiling from upon his bed and fails to walk out the prison walls. He is still a captive. And he’ll most probably turn to speak out and carry forth the knowledge of what is fact and proven to be not true (which is also true in his case) as he is witness of and with good intentions wrapped in package of wisdom just make mention of dangers and lies to his fellow captives that has been spreading like a virus and sprung up like a weed out of nowhere and is growing and multiplying all over.

    I just love those bloody paradoxes. Those that remind me. Hey, anything is possible. Don’t try to wrap your head around everything. There’s no need to. Just the faith that it is so. Ever heard about the mathematicians who has gone crazy. Like in totally cookoo

    • Reply

      Daniel

      4 months ago

      Trying to define infinity. Ever thought about the statement that will always hold true. Within two frequencies or numbers there will always be another. No matter how small we go. Reason would say we’d have to reach zero sometime if we keep on halving the numbers or frequencies. Yet nope. It too will never reach the floor and be nothing. Just like pie. We all know that apparently those numbers never ends. Ever tried writing it all out and wrapping your mind around that. Well I suppose you’ll have a better understanding of what it would mean to disappear in a black hole.

  • Reply

    Paul McCarthy

    4 months ago

    This is an incredible well though out and researched post.

    I think people will read this, enjoy it, find themselves in an empowered emotional state for a period of a few hours immediately after reading the post (during which they may temporarily be in a state where they’ve flipped their subjective validation bias to the positive) and then I predict that most people will fall back to their old ways.

    I can almost guarantee that’s what happen. And I include myself in this group of people.

    So, the question is – how do you permanently affect behavioral change? Is it simply a case of forcing yourself for a period of time until it becomes second nature? Or are there ways of reinforcing things like this? There has to be a tipping point where this new mentality becomes second nature – but I have no idea where this tipping point is, or the quickest way to get there…

    It’s something I’ve been trying to get to the bottom of for a while – would love to hear your input on this!

    Awesome writing as always!
    Paul

    • Reply

      Mark

      4 months ago

      Behavioral change is based on habits, both mental and physical. So thinking in a new way such as this one would require a consistent, conscious effort for a period of time, and then it would slowly get easier until it becomes an unconscious habit.

      Most habits are created or broken in 3-4 weeks. This is way the famous “30 day challenge” is so popular and powerful in both self help, but also business and success.

  • Reply

    Will

    4 months ago

    Possibly your best article yet – and there have been some great ones. Without this mindset EVERY other aspect of our lives are doomed for failure, or mediocrity at best. I know it is touchy-feely stuff but it is in line with “the Law of Attraction”, in that our beliefs and thoughts create our reality. Or better yet, our thoughts and beliefs influence our emotions, which in turn, shape our actions and the outcomes we experience. I have seen this happen for me personally way too much over the last two years (and prior to that negatively speaking) for me not to believe it. Again, great read, Mark!!

  • Reply

    Baller

    4 months ago

    This is a terrific, well written article. One of the best I’ve ever read on the subject. Great job!

  • Reply

    Tim

    4 months ago

    Here’s a video that I thought was quite relevant to this: http://www.ted.com/talks/larry_smith_why_you_will_fail_to_have_a_great_career.html

  • Reply

    Davey

    4 months ago

    The Earth WAS created in 6 days six thousand years ago …

  • Reply

    Aleks

    4 months ago

    I appreciate the article, I found it valueable. A good book on this is Feeling Good by David Burns, which I’m sure you’ve already heard of but it’s worth mentioning again.

    A good idea is to complement this with mindfulness skills, being able to deal more skillfully with the negative thoughts and emotions that arise that is in opposition to your new thought. If you check out Shinzen Young, he has formulated a very impressive paradigm for meditation, saying that it’s mainly 3 skills you cultivate, and you can cultivate these skills in different ways (5 ways is his system). One of them is focus on positive, where one version of that is you think whatever thought you want to start having more often, and then checking to see if there’s any emotional resonance of that thought in the body. This can be then used together with what you wrote.

    And a good metaphor for changing your thoughts is that it’s like trampling down a new road in an unwalked place, in, let’s say, a forest. First, it’s quite difficult and challenging walking, probably lots of plants everywhere etc, but the more you walk it, the more a path starts to form and the easier it will be to take that path, instead of the one you used before. And if it’s walked on enough, maybe you’ll take that road and not even be aware of it because it’s just become a habit to choose that path instead.

  • Reply

    Nierra

    4 months ago

    This is the best most well written article that I have read. The usuage of examples help people relate and see how we can be our own worst enemy. I love that the article ends with ways to avoid this common mindset/ bad habit.

  • Reply

    J.D.

    4 months ago

    “But the problem with us all believing that we’re right is that we’re not”. Should I apply that logic to this article and assume that it’s wrong? Not that I think it is…it all sounds great to me. But then I’m probably wrong. Unless I’m wrong about that.

    • Reply

      Mark

      4 months ago

      I would be wrong to tell you that you were wrong to comment on the article being wrong.

  • Reply

    Mike Livshiz

    3 months ago

    Great article. Excellent views. I agree that everyone could use a little more positive thinking in their lives. However, I do have one question; can this rationale possibly apply to any ambition, for any person’s idea of success?

    The reason I ask this is directly related to some of the examples you make here. In the beginning you mention some of your own limiting beleifs, like the one about waiting to start a blog or the one about gaining muscle mass. Later you go on to describe this musician and one of the examples you use for him is believing that he is not a good enough singer and so will never succeed as one. I think these two sets of examples are very different in nature. The first, your own limiting beliefs, are ones that require effort and hard work. The second is a genetic disposition.

    If a person wants to be the best basketball player they can be and they work very hard at it and their game becomes that of a seasoned veteran, that’s an incredible acheivement. But if that person isn’t happy until they are Lebron James even though they are 5’2″ and not as physically gifted, than they are going to be fooling themselves for the rest of their life.

    A great example of this is American Idol. A lot of very talented singers go on that show and even if they do not succeed on the show, they obviously have the talent to make a career out of singing elsewhere. Others, however, sound like someone put a bunch of ball bearings into a dryer and then become visibly upset when the judges tell them they are no good. I think a lot of this stems from ill-placed positive reinforcement. This girl’s parents told her she could sing since she was 3 so, obviously, she must be good, never mind that she sounds like total shit.

    The point I’m making is that I think your article is an excellent one and the advice in it is something that a person can carry with them their entire life for the purpose of bettering their quality of life, provided that they still maintain a sense of realism to their dreams. Otherwise, they are always going to be dissappointed. I suppose if you can’t sing for shit, you can always learn to play an instrument. But if you keep trying to sing even though you don’t have the pipes, life is gonna a bit depressing, don’t you think?

    • Reply

      aT

      3 months ago

      I think the point mark is trying to make is that one needs to go deep into one’s sub conscience and address our personal limiting beliefs. It isn’t about how tall you are and whether you want to be Lebron James. Its about what you think you are. When you overestimate your potential you create a sort of self awareness that maybe things didn’t work out today but they surely will in the years to come. The problem isnt in underestimating your self . The problem is that people take advantage of it. They crush you when you are down. They feed off the negativity and your weaknesses. They want their share of pie and get extra pleasure from making sure you didnt get as much. Positive people will always assume theres enough pie for everyone. It creates an abundance mindset as opposed to one of frugality.
      By overestimating your abilities you keep negative people at bay and thats what ultimately turns around and gets you going in some form or the other.
      Plus there are some meta physical laws that exist whether one likes to admit it or not. There is no such thing as a atheist. Everyone believes in something. God, Universe, Jesus, Buddha, Gurus, Money , Power : Something.
      Now when you come from a mindset of frugality you basically tell your belief systems aka the universe that you dont have any belief in yourself or in the universe. That you dont think you deserve so and so or are good enough for anything. And the universe responds equally by saying ok if thats what you think of me then so be it.
      Compare this to a mindset of abundace and the universe responds appropriately and says hey heres to you. You might not be George Clooney or Chuck Norris but fuck yeah I love the way you believe in me and I WILL REWARD you appropriately.
      So the bottom line is don’t convert great articles like this into trivial nonsense by asking silly questions about bagpipes and Lebron James. It seems as if you are trying to gain some sort of attention by doing so. Let it go. The world will come to you and you frankly wont give a shit whether you play like Lebron or look like Kobe.

  • Reply

    Carol

    3 months ago

    Thank you for writing this article. I’m glad you broke through your “ropes” and started writing this blog. Your articles are very insightful and give great advice.

  • Reply

    just*us

    3 months ago

    it becomes stronger in us, when what we know is being re-affirmed, my appreciatiation!

  • Reply

    hollywood hank

    3 months ago

    one day i will defeat my arch nemesis hollywood hank

  • Reply

    bharath D S

    3 months ago

    Amazing read, one of your best written articles….

  • Reply

    DAVE

    3 months ago

    This is one of the most startling truths of humankind. It is so easy to be tied down by meager limiting beliefs for the simple fact that you don’t think you have the strength to overcome them.

    You tell yourself that great musicians are rare. You like making music, but you just don’t have that rare skillset that will elevate you to that level of greatness. Therefore, you can never become a great musician.

    The fact is, people are always going to think your crazy when you go for something big. Once you realize you can break free from these weak ropes, you will be easily misunderstood by those who remain tied down. You might as well be operating in a different dimension than they are. But once you truly realize that these ties can be broken, a world of possibilities opens up for your exploration. And who knows, you may just become that great musician and shock the world.

  • Reply

    Jack coxwell

    3 months ago

    This was one amazing Article. I woke up feeling pretty shitty this morning. After reading this, and realizing that I actually do have a lot of limiting beliefs left (no matter how arrogant I am and try to pretend they aren’t there)I feel more empowered to break free of them. Thanks again dude.

  • Reply

    EDUARD LOPEZ

    3 months ago

    After reading this magnificent article, I feel deep in my heart that dreams can come true if you really want to make it happen. Thanks Mark for sharing your knowledge in those areas where all of us may stand on and take action. I am from Barcelona, Spain. Greetings from there. Eduard.

  • Reply

    fritagoni

    2 months ago

    Wow Iove this article, I am going to start overestimating everything I do instead of under-estimating.Instead of thinking “Most woman don’t find me attractive” I can instead say “All woman love me and find me attractive”.

  • Reply

    Aljoscha Laschgari

    1 month ago

    Thanks Mark for the effort you put into this article!

  • Reply

    Samy

    1 month ago

    Great article, simply amazing. Love how you actually talk about recognizing the ropes before breaking them as I think that’s the hardest step.

    Anyway just wanted to point out that all the examples are refereed to is a He or Man. Seeing as you’re being gender neutral now(and I know the advice works for both genders) this is the only new article I’ve seen you written with only male examples. Women examples may make it easier to relate, talking from my own experience where I really saw myself in most of the examples.

    Just my two cents

    Samy

    • Reply

      Mark Manson

      1 month ago

      Hey Samy, this article was written at the beginning of 2012! I do need to edit the archives to make it all gender neutral at some point though.

      Glad you liked it. :)

  • Reply

    Michael Kelly

    1 month ago

    Delusional Self-Confidence. I like that. Or, as we say in the music business: “Fake it ’til you make it.” I believe that the concept of “letting go” is a crucial part of any growth, and I make that a central part of my private music lessons. This blog dovetails nicely with that theme. Self-limiting beliefs are usually the only thing holding a person back from achieving his/her dreams. When you let go of those beliefs and act “as if” you were born to be a musician (or whatever your particular dream is), you will most likely be astonished at how quickly you progress along the path towards fulfilling your dream. Thanks for sharing your thoughts along these lines.

  • Reply

    Christina Irwin

    19 weeks ago

    AWESOME!!! Love all your articles!!!

  • Reply

    Nikhil

    4 weeks ago

    Hi Mark
    Good stuff! Thanks a bunch!
    Best wishes,
    Nikhil.

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