Shut Up And Find A Career

Shut Up And Find A Career

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The following is a guest post by Elizabeth Newkirk. Elizabeth has a career.

I have a friend who is a recent college graduate, works a minimum wage job, and lives with his parents. Let’s call him Bob.

Bob has talked about more get-rich-quick schemes in the past two years than I care to count. Bob initially wanted to be a teacher, but he decided the salary was too low and quit the accelerated degree program he was enrolled in. He also talked about traveling the world, but declined my offer to send him information about ESL (English as a Second Language) jobs abroad. In between stories about hypothetical businesses he’s going to launch overnight, Bob complains about working six days a week and living at home.

You know what I’d love to say to Bob? Shut up and find a career.

If you’re unemployed, stuck in a dead-end job, or simply hate the profession that’s steadily crushing your soul, this post is for you. Careers aren’t born overnight, but there are three things you should be doing to set yourself up for success. For starters:

1. Get Entry-Level Experience

Most people sit around trying to think themselves into a new career when you should be out there trying them out for yourself. Firsthand experience is the best way to know if a particular career is a good fit for you. More importantly, experience also establishes your credibility to future employers.

Like most people, I learned this the hard way. My post-graduation plan was to join the Peace Corps. Shortly after I submitted my application, I went to Peru for two months and taught English at an elementary school. When I returned, I realized that was definitely not what I wanted to do and immediately withdrew my candidacy.

Don’t get me wrong; I had some great times in Peru. But the overall experience was a gut-wrenching reality check about what life would be like as a Peace Corps volunteer. I no longer felt comfortable committing 27 months of service in a location I had no say in choosing. I later decided that I still wanted to teach English abroad, but I wanted to do it on my own terms.

So before you quit your day job or take out more student loans to pay for graduate school, I strongly recommend you try on a career for size. Fortunately there are a number of ways to do this.

Internships and volunteering are excellent ways to develop professional experience. Non-profit organizations are the best places to look for opportunities, as they tend to be understaffed and underfunded. Many non-profits have opportunities in grant writing, fundraising, program development, marketing, and web design.

If an organization doesn’t offer a specific internship or volunteer program, then go directly to the staff and ask how you can get involved. Yes, offer your services for free. This is what the world has come to, but if you want experience and want a foot in the door, you have to be willing to do anything for it.

Explain why you want to be part of their particular organization, and mention the skills and experience you hope to gain. Since compensation is usually not available, non-profits are typically more flexible working around your schedule and are often more than happy to help you reach your professional goals.

Finally, if you don’t have time or money to spare, try an externship. Externships are similar to internships, but are typically much shorter in length (anywhere from a day to a few weeks).

If you need to learn a particular skill, you can always attend workshops or enroll in a certificate programs. However, don’t spend a lot of money on classes unless it’s absolutely necessary. For example, you don’t need to take a creative writing seminar to become a writer. You just need to start writing. If you want to start your own company, draft a business plan. If you want to save the whales, join Greenpeace. No matter how you do it, the key here is to take action. Remember, gaining experience is about more than having a solid resume; it’s about finding out whether a career is right for you.

2. Build your network

If you use Monster or CareerBuilder to look for jobs, before you continue reading I need you to complete the following steps:

  • Raise your hand to about eye level.
  • Put your hand in front of your face (palm facing you).
  • Facepalm (the palm of your hand should make a loud smacking sound when it makes contact with your forehead).

About 80% of job openings aren’t advertised to the public, and for good reason. Most employers are legally required to keep a record of every application they receive for up to 1-2 years after a hiring period has ended. Factor a shitty job market, in which there is a highly disproportionate ratio of job seekers to available positions and unsurprisingly, companies who do post job openings online are inundated with thousands of applications from unqualified candidates. It’s a nightmare for HR departments everywhere.

When a job opens up most companies just go directly to their employees and ask them if they know anyone who is qualified and interested in applying for the position. So, how do you find the career opportunities if you can’t see them?

The answer is networking. Networking is building relationships with people who know your professional interests, skills, and goals. Your network can potentially include family members, friends, professors, coaches, colleagues, bosses, mentors, or anyone who hands you a business card. From there, it’s a ripple effect; the individuals in your network can connect you to the people in their network, and so on.

There are plenty of ways to build your network. If you want to expand your connections in a particular field, you can join a professional association or attend business networking events. If you don’t want to commit to membership fees or meetings, contact your school’s alumni association or check to see if it has an online directory. Alumni are a great way to expand your professional circle because you already have something in common.

Networking doesn’t have to be a formal process. Participating in clubs, volunteering in your community, and going to your professors’ office hours are all opportunities to network with others.

That being said, don’t network for the sake of networking. Let’s say you’re interested in a woman, but she only makes an effort to see you when her other plans fall through. She never initiates contact unless she needs you to do something for her (e.g. to move her couch into her new apartment). Clearly she doesn’t appreciate you and has no shame in using you. Feels pretty crappy, doesn’t it?

It’s no different with networking. It’s tacky to only contact someone when you need a letter of recommendation or help finding a job. No matter how busy you may be, you should occasionally call, email, or get coffee with the people in your professional circle for no reason other than to catch up.

Furthermore, networking should be mutually beneficial. People are generally willing to help you for nothing in return, but you should look for ways to help them out when the opportunity presents itself.

Even if you have the career of your dreams, you should still be networking. Job security is a luxury that few of us have, and the time to start building connections isn’t when you’re out on the streets. As the saying goes, “Build your network before you need it, and your ‘net’ will ‘work’ for you.”

For more on networking, check out Never Eat Alone by Keith Ferrazzi.

3. Track your professional development

We often don’t realize our own progress unless we take a step back and think about it.

Every job is a learning experience, no matter how loathsome it is. It’s important to take the time to reflect on your professional development so that you can see how far you’ve come, and evaluate how you can continue to grow.

One of the easiest ways to track your professional development is to regularly update your resume. Your resume should not merely summarize your roles and responsibilities, but emphasize your accomplishments.

For example, if you were involved in a research project, what was the purpose? If you worked on a fundraising campaign, how much money did you raise? Along with results-oriented descriptions of your professional experiences, your resume should include any promotions or honors you’ve received, as well as leadership experience.

Ask your friends or colleagues to critique your resume. In addition to having an extra set of eyes to catch mistakes, an objective reviewer will let you know if your job descriptions are too confusing, wordy, or vague. Make sure you ask people who are brutally honest, have an eye for detail, and know how to spell.

Another great way to track your progress is to keep an archive of your work in a portfolio. Portfolios are great tools for job interviews because they provide tangible proof of your expertise. The artifacts you include in your portfolio are entirely up to you, but may include: writing samples, letters of recommendation, photos, charts, flyers, proposals- literally anything that visually documents the projects, activities, and experiences you have been involved in.

LinkedIn is another great way to track your accomplishments. In addition to providing your work history, you can also ask your network connections to publicly endorse you or include a list of projects you have completed. Make sure your profile is 100% complete and your network connections are genuine professional contacts. This isn’t Facebook; LinkedIn monitors connection “rejections” in order to track spammers threatening the site’s legitimacy. So don’t go around requesting connections from everyone you ever met so that your look popular. For more thorough guide on how to make yourself stand out on LinkedIn, check out Michael Park’s guest post.

Tracking your professional development will give you a good idea of where you are and where you need to be. If you are consistently revising your portfolio to incorporate new projects and accomplishments, you’re on the right track. If your resume barely fills a page or lists your summer job from 10 years ago, you’ve got work to do.

Now what?

Remember my friend Bob from earlier? I have another friend in a remarkably similar situation; she’s an underemployed college graduate living at home. Let’s call her Marley (I’m not clever with pseudonyms).

After deciding not to go to law school, Marley identified marketing as one of her professional interests. She asked me to review her resume, and then applied to several entry-level positions in marketing that she heard about through her professional network.

Within a few weeks Marley was invited to interview with several companies. She did everything that I just told you to do… and she’s still underemployed and living at home.

Experience, networking, and a shining track record don’t automatically grant you a Golden Ticket to the Wonka Factory of Dream Careers. Finding a career involves both hard work and luck. Sometimes there are zero positions available when you need one. Sometimes your competition is more qualified than you. There are a million reasons why you may not get an opportunity to shine, and you don’t have any control over those circumstances.

You do, however, have control over the “hard work” aspect. Stop complaining about the shitty job market. Don’t dwell on missed opportunities; find new ones. Take responsibility for your failures. Ask for help when you need it.

Above all, shut up and do something about it.

Elizabeth Newkirk has a career. You can follow her on Twitter here: @ENewks.

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47 Comments

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  • Reply

    Zac

    3 months ago

    Well done. I used to work as a job coach and half of my job was helping people find employment. Truth be told it’s not easy to find a good job or career and it does take a lot of work as you outlined in your post. It can be hard not to get discouraged but nothing worth having comes easy.

  • Reply

    Jack

    3 months ago

    Came across as a bit “ranty” for me.

    • Reply

      Greg

      3 months ago

      To fair, the heading has Shut up in it and that does set the tone for this article.

    • Reply

      Dan @ Casual Kitchen

      3 months ago

      Zac, really sorry that the tone didn’t agree with you. Then again, did you take any action as a result of reading this post? No?

  • Reply

    Daniel

    3 months ago

    I’m not really a fan of the old-fashioned get a career and stick with it diatribe. I just don’t see it as being realistic or particularly positive for long-term happiness.

    I see how a career could offer more security (assuming that this recession has seen its worst days) but I also think that more security is probably a bad thing because it becomes easier to make excuses and eventually you accumulate more ‘things’ and they will own you, holding you down like an anchor and really for me that’s it… A career is an anchor and I don’t like to commit like that as I think more important than money or anything else is being able to live life as you wish. Anchors and commitments seriously, seriously hamper the ability to do so.

    Also congratulations on your career I hope it makes you very happy but I don’t need one to be.

    • Reply

      Elizabeth

      3 months ago

      Hey, Daniel. Perhaps I should clarify: a career is not some job you have long term. A career is basically how you define yourself professionally.

      For example, my current job title is “English language assistant at French high school.” However, I would define my career as “international education, language, and culture professional.” That’s not what I’d put on a business card, but that’s how I would define my overarching focus and interests.

      As many former employers have told me, the old days of working at one company for 20 years and retiring are long gone. So just because you have a career doesn’t mean you’ll be stuck with one job title for the rest of your life. That’s why experience, networking, and tracking your development are so important; the world is changing fast, so this is how you keep up.

  • Reply

    Mat

    3 months ago

    Reading that article all I can think is… “commiserations”

    Commiserations on your career, Elizabeth.

    I see your point – if you want a career, it’s out there, but you gotta hustle like a mofo – but … working for other people kinda sucks, ya know?

    I think Mark is a pretty good example of a better alternative plan.

    • Reply

      Zac

      3 months ago

      Career

      Noun:
      An occupation undertaken for a significant period of a person’s life and with opportunities for progress.

      It seems as though Mark has a career

      Also, looking at this article it seems to go right along with the things I have to do as an independent contractor to be successful. This article could be called “Shut up and Develop Yourself Professionally” which anyone has to do to make a good amount of money doing anything (unless you luck out).

  • Reply

    Turner

    3 months ago

    This post hit home, as I went through this situation and all the turmoil/emotions that went with it. Deer in the headlights. Where to go, how to find a mentor, bullshit online MLM or IM schemes. Even after going to a good school and with connections, I felt lost. This advice is pretty good. ACTION. You will change what you do most likely but you never know until you put some skin in the game. I tried to find counselors, read books, talk to random business people, travel everywhere under the assumptions I would find it. But you gotta take action and move from that point. Not get stuck in your head of living by hypotheticals. I found this site a bit helpful – http://www.teamtechnology.co.uk/ – basically a Myers-Briggs but with more info about potential jobs and careers and satisfaction. That led me to what I am doing now…traveling the world, doing different jobs, and seeing what sticks. Your blog resonates with me. Solid.

    Turner

    • Reply

      Elizabeth

      3 months ago

      Good for you, Turner. I haven’t been to that site before but I’ll have to check it out.

  • Reply

    Lakshay Behl

    3 months ago

    Hey Mark!

    Huge fan of “most” of your work. Long time reader. First comment from me.

    I am surprised what someone like you is doing posting such “Advice” on your website, when you yourself are living proof that single handed six figure businesses are not uncommon, let alone impossible.

    It took me five years and $100,000 (debt) to be able to beat my fear of failure. I’d borrow money for advertising, and then would not advertise for the fear of failing. Did this for five years.

    It took another $60,000 in failures before I got my first success. There was a time I was getting advice like this left, right and center. The thought of throwing in the towel did cross my mind. However, I did’t.

    I essentially thought, and read, and strategized and failed my way to a powerful career. If my career so far is anything to go by, there is no such thing as an impeccable track record. Unless you are blowing someone to rise. How do you even succeed without failing?

    I am actually amused I am saying all this to you, of all people.

    Are you sure your intentions behind publishing this article were genuine?

    Finding a good career takes luck? Seriously?

    There is too much projection in this article. Keep in mind, not everyone is as persistent as I was. Someone who believes in you might just throw in the towel and accept this advice. Beware!

    You have a power. The power of reaching people. People who learn from you and believe in what you say. Comes with a responsibility. You have been warned.

    • Reply

      Mark Manson

      3 months ago

      Single-handed six-figure businesses ARE very uncommon. 90% of new businesses fail within a year. 90% of those that made it will then fail within five years.

      And a startling number of men I’ve worked with over the years have been unemployed and completely clueless when it comes to getting a basic career job. So I do think the topic is quite relevant.

      • Reply

        jon

        3 months ago

        how long do you think post masculine will go on for then ?

      • Reply

        Lakshay Behl

        3 months ago

        1% succeed then? Good enough for me.

        It’s basically just a race. There is no denying that. Some will succeed, some will fail. Like I said I failed far too many times before ever hitting success. But I learned. And I am glad I failed for all those years.

        I think it’s the entire generations being raised upon the notion of an easy career that leads to overall failure of society. In a capitalistic country such as the US, when people focus too much on the 90% stat, they fail to keep their eye on the pie.

        Besides, with the amount of marketing training available today, it is ridiculous how many people just don’t take it and run with it.

        The problem is deeper. Fear of failure is imbibed inside of growing children. Persistence is often confused with annoyance. The real problem is as follows. When people fail two or three times (if they manage to act at all) they give up. They are forced to. People look upon them as if they are failures. Their own family members start despising them.

        Few people encourage them. None of the encouragement comes from friends or family.

        The advice to get a “normal” career comes in left, right and center.

        It’s HARD not to give up then.

        This article makes it harder for those in that position.

        • Reply

          Mark Manson

          3 months ago

          Just because you wanted to be an entrepreneur doesn’t mean that everybody wants to be an entrepreneur (or even should be an entrepreneur). Plenty of people just want a stable, respectable career. And there’s nothing wrong with that.

          • Lakshay Behl

            3 months ago

            Yeah well, I have great respect for those people too. I might become one of them once I have done what I have set out to do.

            I only wrote for those who do want to be the owners of a business and could risk taking this advice.

            For people who want a career, I’d say this is great advice. I personally wouldn’t hire anyone doing any of these things, I feel comfortable only after I have seen someone in the middle of action. But still, this is great advice when presented to the right audience.

      • Reply

        Lakshay Behl

        3 months ago

        Also, if the fundamentals are sound… value, hungry crowd, systems, testing etc…. it does not matter how many new businesses are being started. I can bet if all new businesses had the fundamentals of value and marketing down, none of them would “fail”.

        Looking back upon all my failures, all of them lacked either an engine of growth, or didn’t make sense mathematically, or didn’t have a right offer, or I didn’t have a way of reaching a hungry crowd cost effectively.

        When all the ducks line up, success is inevitable.

        If in 2013 a Million new businesses are incorporated and half of those have sound fundamentals, then the 90% failure ratio will go down to 50%. There is no need for businesses to fail. The stat exists because in 99% of the businesses, the founders don’t have their fundamentals right.

        Simple, eh?

        So as long as you keep creating new content for your regular readers, OR you find a way to cost effectively reach new readers, your business will thrive. Isn’t that how it works?

      • Reply

        Lakshay Behl

        3 months ago

        One more thing… Is there a causation or is it a correlation that many men who need help with dating are also struggling financially?

        “Money and success are universal lubricants” aren’t they?

        • Reply

          Mark Manson

          3 months ago

          There’s a strong link… it has mostly to do with a man’s sense of identity and self-esteem though, and less to do with how women actually perceive him.

    • Reply

      Zac

      3 months ago

      “You have a power. The power of reaching people. People who learn from you and believe in what you say. Comes with a responsibility. You have been warned.”

      =/=

      “1% succeed then? Good enough for me.”

      Also

      “Looking back upon all my failures, all of them lacked either an engine of growth, or didn’t make sense mathematically, or didn’t have a right offer, or I didn’t have a way of reaching a hungry crowd cost effectively.

      When all the ducks line up, success is inevitable.”

      this is a pretty large oversimplification of what it takes to make a personal business succeed and people spend years hammering out how to do all of those things. A lot of the advice in this article would help someone trying to accomplish those goals as well.

      • Reply

        Lakshay Behl

        3 months ago

        With all due respect, I wasn’t trying to fit an entire business philosophy in a comment or three.

  • Reply

    Alvar

    3 months ago

    Elizabeth has a career.

    Best byline ever ;)

    • Reply

      Elizabeth

      3 months ago

      Sometimes less is more, right? haha

  • Reply

    Tony

    3 months ago

    Thanks Mark

  • Reply

    Thomas

    3 months ago

    What’s your source for the “80% of job openings aren’t advertised” claim?

    • Reply

      Zac

      3 months ago

      I googled and pretty easily found a lot of articles using 70-80% as the stat for this. Here is an NPR article.

      http://www.npr.org/2011/02/08/133474431/a-successful-job-search-its-all-about-networking

    • Reply

      jesseislil

      2 months ago

      @Thomas I’ve attended job market seminars hosted at my alma mater by experts in HR and job market data research. We were taught a similar figure advocating that most of the jobs available today are not listed/published anywhere. With the development of social media networks like linkedin, many companies are now able to successfully hire internally or recruit through extensive networks that such technologies allow.

  • Reply

    Patrick

    3 months ago

    Question about networking: I suck at remembering names, at dislike networking specifically because I’m afraid of running into someone I’ve met but forgot their name. I’m guessing Never Eat Alone addresses this (purchased it today), but do you have any words of wisdom regarding building a large body of professional contacts without losing track of who’s who? Or am I approaching networking with the wrong mindset?
    Nice article, by the way. No more monster.com for me.

    • Reply

      Elizabeth

      3 months ago

      One thing that helps me is that after meeting someone new I’ll send them a follow up email. It can be as simple as saying “It was great meeting you today” and mentioning a few specific things that you talked about. It doesn’t even have to be about business; for example, one time a businessman mentioned his son wanted to go to my university’s business school, so in my follow up email I included the link to its direct admit program.

      Following up right away will not only help you to remember people’s names and information, but it will help them remember YOU.

  • Reply

    David

    3 months ago

    Although readers seem a little ‘Mark patriotic’ perhaps, I hope you guys keep up with having regular guest posts, I think it adds to the site and makes it more magaziney, which I like.

    • Reply

      Elizabeth

      3 months ago

      Thanks David :)

  • Reply

    SexyBack

    3 months ago

    Is this ‘our’ Elizabeth writing?

    *lip wobble*

  • Reply

    Matty

    3 months ago

    Great article Elizabeth. I’m a little surprised by the criticism on here. These people seem to conflate a career with a soul sucking nine to five. People seem to be so enamoured with what Mark’s doing with his business, which is great, but here’s the reality; that’s a career too. Having a career isn’t going to tie you down; you can always leave, change vocations, and try something else. But you need to do SOMETHING right now.

    I’d also add to this list: be willing to move. There may be better career opportunities outside of your home town, or even outside of your country. You’ll never know if you’ll like it unless you go for it.

    • Reply

      Elizabeth

      3 months ago

      Thanks!

  • Reply

    Kwjibo

    3 months ago

    Good article.

    The juxtaposition with the person that did everything right, but is still jobless, is very realistic.

    I took to learning a profession in my late twenties; I’m about halfway through the training. Whilst I dont deny any man his right to ‘lifestyle design’ (and I personally wouldn’t mind a second-income stream at this point in my career), hawking affiliate marketing and whatnot is certainly not what I’d want as the entirety of my working life.

    A lot of commenters seem to view this post as at odds with an entrepreneurial lifestyle; I personally think there’s more overlap than people acknowledge.

    Good post.

  • Reply

    Justin Mares

    3 months ago

    Seriously? An entire post about how to get a career.. and then at the end an example of someone who took her advice and didn’t get one?

    I thought this whole post was a bit fluffy, and didn’t actually add anything valuable to the conversation. Update your resume and LinkedIn and “network” aren’t exactly game changing bits of wisdom.

    The best two sites/resources I’ve seen for thinking about how to get a career are these:
    http://www.slideshare.net/choehn/recessionproof-graduate-1722966
    http://www.iwillteachyoutoberich.com/blog/

    • Reply

      Elizabeth

      3 months ago

      My example is a true story, but consider if I had used an alternative ending: “My friend did all of this and now she has a career!” To imply that this article offers some magic algorithm for finding a career would be ridiculous.

      This article was never meant to be a “game changer.” I can’t offer you any secret formulas or algorithms for finding a career. What I can do is outline some simple things you should be doing to get you on track. Some readers may not need the advice or scoff that it’s “fluffy”, but I’m sure there are plenty of readers who may glean something useful from it.

  • Reply

    Pellaeon

    3 months ago

    I definitely feel this is good advice. Though I must add – careerbuilder should not be dismissed out of hand. When I graduated in 2008, I was convinced that careerbuilder was a waste of time and that I should just focus all my efforts on networking. My mom insisted that I should keep applying online every day. Sure enough, the two highest paid jobs I’ve held (including the one I currently hold) I obtained purely from applying on CareerBuilder.

    I want to add that it’s nice to see an article here that’s more nine-to-five friendly. I have neither the interest nor motivation to start my own business. I like working on a team, and I like letting someone else worry about all the nitty-gritty business details that affect the bottom line. I’d rather focus on performing my particular skill and take my paychecks as scheduled.

    • Reply

      Elizabeth

      3 months ago

      True, not all online job sites are created equal. It’s certainly not impossible to get hired from an online posting. However, focusing on your network is generally better advice than “apply to hundreds of jobs online.”

      Glad you found it nine-to-five friendly; that was the point! Like Mark said in an above comment, not everyone can (or should) be an entrepreneur. If entrepreneurship is your thing, that’s awesome but this article won’t have much to offer to you. But for the rest of the world, it hopefully offers some useful information.

  • Reply

    jamie flexman

    3 months ago

    I am totally in sync with this article and I truly believe that most people do indeed need to shut up and do something about their lives. Whether this be a new career, a move within their existing career or simply to go it alone.

    It took me years to pluck up the courage to leave my crappy job behind and focus on my true calling, which happens to be working for myself. Yet a lot of people just want a better career path or a higher wage or some stability that they don’t currently have.

    The problem most people have is deciding to make that big change and not giving up once they are heading in the right direction. Setbacks will occur and times may get hard but that’s just what separates those who do from those who moan. Hard work and determination will always reap it’s rewards eventually providing you are willing to meet your goals halfway.

    I think everyone should just be doing something with their lives that they can look at and be proud of. Proud of the hard work they do, proud of what they are accomplishing and proud of themselves for having a life they feel content with.

    I’d rather be a genuinely happy volunteer than a lonely, depressed millionaire.

  • Reply

    Jean

    3 months ago

    This is why i’m gonna be a tramp or just win the lottery lol

  • Reply

    anon

    3 months ago

    I’m in a stuck position in life. I haven’t been working in the last few years. I got sick of my last career and decided to travel and take a career break. I had money socked away to last a few years. I’m now getting close to the point where I have to figure out something by next year before I run out of cash reserves. Problem is, I have absolutely no idea what I want to do with life. I’m 36 so maybe it’s something of a mid-life crisis. I can’t see going back to college and there’s just nothing that jumps out at me as far as something I’m just burning to do. I don’t feel any calling in life(though I desperately wish I did but don’t know what it is). I envy people who have something they absolutely know they want to do even if it’s difficult to attain. I have a friend who is trying to break into Hollywood and make it as a screenwriter. He has a huge hurdle and he’s living like a starving artist but that is his beacon and that’s what he wakes up everyday knowing he wants to do more than anything in the world. I don’t have anything like this. Days fly by and I’m not making any life progress and I feel I’m no closer to discovering a passion I could turn into a career now than I was a year ago.

    Where does one start when they need to come up with a viable new career option from scratch? What do you do when nothing really jumps out at you as something you want to spend the next 10 years doing? I’m sure there’s something out there I’d love out of the thousands of possible career options, but if you don’t know what it is, how do you find it? Everytime I hear about friends around me getting promoted, making good money and having rewarding careers, I feel like more and more of a loser. I’m trying to get back on track but am having a hard time figuring out how to start over from scratch at this age.

  • Reply

    Chris

    3 months ago

    I’d like to write a follow up article, “Shut up and get in the kitchen”.

    The following is a guest post by Chris. Chris has a kitchen.

  • Reply

    Paul T

    3 months ago

    Great article, and if anyone hasn’t read Never Eat Alone, they should check it out. I’ve read mine so many times the spine is falling apart!

  • Reply

    Jammer

    3 months ago

    The only thing I have against this is that not everyone gets the job they want, or the business they want. If they work hard enough, and have the correct principles down pat then they’ll probably come out fairly well off but really, no country has a 0% unemployment rate for a reason. Do we want everyone to be CEO of a company? Who’s going to be a janitor, eh?

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